Calendar

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Monday

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Sunday

The building completed in 1933 as Paimio Sanatorium was of key importance to the international career of architects Alvar and Aino Aalto. Together with Vyborg (Viipuri) Library, completed two years later, it gave the Aaltos an international profile. Finnish architecture was no longer merely the receiver of influences from outside.

Designed in

1929-33

Location

Finland, Paimio

— 1

Entrance. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum

— 2

Plan of Paimio Sanatorium. Drawing: Alvar Aalto Museum

— 3

Patient wing with sun terraces in 1930s. Photo: Gustaf Welin, Alvar Aalto Museum

— 4

Patient wing with sun terraces altered to interior spaces. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum

— 5

Plan of the patient wing. Drawing: Alvar Aalto Museum

— 6

Section. Drawing: Alvar Aalto Museum

— 7

Top floor sun terrace in 1933. Photo: Gustaf Welin, Alvar Aalto Museum

— 8

Patiens in the top floor terrace in 1934. Photo: Gustaf Welin, Alvar Aalto Museum

— 9

Room for patients in 1933. Photo: Gustaf Welin, Alvar Aalto Museum

— 10

Parantolaan suunniteltu pesuallas. Kuva: Alvar Aalto -museo

— 11

Paimio chairs were used in the sanatorium. Photo: Gustaf Welin, Alvar Aalto Museum

— 12

Sanatorium during summer. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum

— 13

Site plan. Drawing: Alvar Aalto Museum

— 14

Aerial photo of the sanatorium. Photo: Alvar Aalto Museum

Guided tours

Guided tours:
Magni Mundi Oy / Karoliina Vitikainen
+358 44 977 89 81
sales@magnimundi.fi

Later alterations

With the advent of antibiotics, tuberculosis could be cured and ceased to be such a terrifying disease, so the sanatorium was gradually converted into a general hospital from the early 1960s onwards.

After Alvar Aalto’s death in 1976, his office, Alvar Aalto & Co, was in charge of alterations, under the leadership of architect Elissa Aalto from 1976 until 1994; since 1996, design work has been carried out by LPR Architects.

Over the years, the hospital buildings have been altered considerably, but the key characteristics of the architecture and much of the original furniture have been preserved. In recent years, hospital functions have been transferred elsewhere and a new use has been sought for the building.

For new needs to be in harmony with this unique architectural whole, the issues of the future use of the building and change management have to be resolved before the work, started by the National Board of Antiquities, on seeking UNESCO World Heritage status, can be resumed.

Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum

More information

www.paimionparantola.fi

Guided tours: Magni Mundi Oy
sales@magnimundi.fi

Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum

Visit Paimio Sanatorium

See available tours at visit.alvaraalto.fi