Calendar

Admission fees

Price
18
Students and senior citizens
9
Museum card
Groups

80 € + 12 € per person

reservation required: riihitie@alvaraalto.fi

Helsinki Card and DOCOMOMO International member card

16 € / 7 € and 15% discount on products from the museum shop

Free admission

Children under 18 years (with guardian)

ICOM, ICOMOS cards

Combined admission The Aalto House + Studio Aalto

Normal price 30 € / person

Students and senior citizens 15 € / person

Children under 18 years (with guardian) free admission

Groups 80 € + 20 € per person (reservation required: riihitie@alvaraalto.fi)

School groups by prior agreement

Studio Aalto is located 500 meters from the Aalto House

Guided tours

1.1.–31.1.
Tue-Fri13.00
Sat13.00, 14.00, 15.00
1.2.–30.4.
Tue-Sun13.00, 14.00, 15.00
1.5.–31.7.
Tue-Sun13.00, 14.00, 15.00, 16.00
1.8.–31.8.
Mon-Sun13.00, 14.00, 15.00, 16.00, 17.00
1.9.–30.9.
Tue-Sun13.00, 14.00, 15.00, 16.00
1.10.–30.11.
Tue-Sun13.00, 14.00, 15.00
1.12.–31.12.
Tue-Fri13.00
Sat13.00, 14.00, 15.00

Exceptions in opening times

6.12.Independence DayClosed
24.12.Christmas EveClosed
25.12.Christmas DayClosed

Guided tours

1.1.–31.1.
Tue-Fri13.00
Sat13.00, 14.00, 15.00
1.2.–30.4.
Tue-Sun13.00, 14.00, 15.00
1.5.–31.7.
Tue-Sun13.00, 14.00, 15.00, 16.00
1.8.–31.8.
Mon-Sun13.00, 14.00, 15.00, 16.00, 17.00
1.9.–30.9.
Tue-Sun13.00, 14.00, 15.00, 16.00
1.10.–30.11.
Tue-Sun13.00, 14.00, 15.00
1.12.–31.12.
Tue-Fri13.00
Sat13.00, 14.00, 15.00

Exceptions in opening times

6.12.Independence DayClosed
24.12.Christmas EveClosed
25.12.Christmas DayClosed

Description

In 1934, Aino and Alvar Aalto acquired a site in almost completely untouched surroundings at Riihitie in Helsinki’s Munkkiniemi. They started designing their own house which was completed in August 1936.

The house was designed as both a family home and an office and these two functions can clearly be seen from the outside. The slender mass of the office wing is in white-painted, lightly rendered brickwork. There are still clear references to Functionalism in the location of the windows. The cladding material of the residential part is slender, dark-stained timber battens. The building has a flat roof and a large south-facing terrace.

Although the streetside elevation of the house is severe and closed-off, it is softened by climbing plants and a slate path leading up to the front door. There are already signs of the ‘new’ Aalto in the Aalto House, of the Romantic Functionalist. The plentiful use of wood as a finishing material and four open hearts built in brick also point to this.

The Aalto House anticipates the Villa Mairea, a luxury residence where Aalto’s creativity was able to come into full bloom. But in contrast to its larger sister, the Aalto House is a cosy, intimate building for living and working, designed by two architects for themselves, using simple uncluttered materials.